Tuesday, May 30, 2006

My Favorite Lemon Tart

One of the thing that I always do when I visited Grenville Island is to buy a lemon tart from one of the bakery there. I love the soft crumbly feature of the crust, I love the balance between the tartness of the filling and the sweetness of it.

When ever I have the craving for something sweet and tart, I always made this Lemon Tart recipe. The original recipe actually is for making Lemon Bar but I like the shape of a tart better than the squareness of a bar, it just look more fancy to me I. But when I have to make it in large amount for potluck for example, then I will made it into bars again.

When I made it into tart, the tart mold can only made half of this recipe so I have to made it twice since I only own one tart mold with 10 inches diameter.

I like my lemon bar a bit thinner than normal. A little bit more dainty!

Oh, this recipe I get from
  • Barefoot Contessa Parties book
  • .


    LEMON BARS

    For the crust:
    1/2 lb unsalted butter at room temperature
    1/2 cup granulated sugar
    2 cups all purpose flour
    1/8 tsp salt

    For the filling:
    6 extra-large eggs at room temperature
    3 cups granulated sugar
    2 tbs grated lemon zest ( 4-6 lemons )
    1 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
    1 cup all purpose flour

    Confectioners' sugar for dusting.

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    For the crust, cream the butter and sugar until light in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Combine the flour and salt and , with the mixer on low, add to the butter until just mixed. Dump the dough onto a well-floured board and gather into a ball. Flatten the dough with floured hands and press it into a 9 x 13 x 2-inch baking sheet, building up a 1/2-inch edge on all sides. Chill.

    Bake the crust for 15 - 20 minutes, until very lightly browned. Let cool on a wire rack. Leave the oven on.

    For the filling, whisk together the eggs, sugar, lemon zest, lemon juice, and flour. Pour over the crust and bake for 30 - 35 minutes, until the filling is set. Let cool to room temperature.

    Cut into triangle and dust with confectioner's sugar.

    Thursday, May 25, 2006

    Pasta Aglio Olio

    Baby sitting is really good at making me watch all those cooking channel and this is one of the result. I saw this pasta dish on FoodTV Canada. Once I saw how easy to make it and I bet most household will have the ingredients in their pantry, I could not resist to try it right away for our dinner.


    Spaghetti Aglio Olio
    Yield: 4
    Ingredients:
    Spaghetti Aglio Olio

    * 1 lb. Spaghetti (500g)
    * 4 oz breadcrumbs (100g)
    * 1 bunch (small) Italian parsley, finely chopped
    * 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
    * 3 cloves garlic, diced
    * 3 x dried chili peppers, crushed (optional)
    * Salt to season


    Directions:

    1. Bring salted water to a boil, and cook spaghetti for about 8 minute. Remove just before the al dente stage. Drain but reserve a few ladles of pasta water.
    2. Toast breadcrumbs along with parsley in a dry saucepan until golden brown.
    3. In another pan, heat extra virgin olive oil and combine garlic and chili peppers. Cook for a few minutes or until golden brown. Do not burn the garlic; otherwise it will become bitter.
    4. Add spaghetti to the pan with olive oil and mix well. To prevent dryness, ladle some pasta water to the pasta. Cook for another minute or until desired state of al dente.
    5. Mix in toasted breadcrumbs and parsley before serving.


    Note: I add Parmesan cheese on top of my pasta. That breadcrumbs topping is called poor man cheese. It's good if you can't eat diary product.

    When I made this dish, I did not even use the recipe because it's that simple. Richard and Kai Kai love this dish so much that they both begged me to make it again. Richard even drove me to the grocery store so I can buy 3 packs of pasta since I used up all my pasta when I made this dish! I love it when they both loves a very easy recipe like this one!!!

    Note: Another reason why I made this dish is because I want to use my home made stale bread.

    Making Home Made Yogurt For The First Time



    If you see on the right bar of my blog, you will see I posted many other foodie websites that I admire. From
  • Candied Quince
  • , I read a posting about home made yogurt that she made. According to her, a home made yogurt taste better than the store bought yogurt and since she ate yogurt on daily basis, she must have know about it pretty well and this intrigue me to try it also.

    Actually, I am not a yogurt eater but I know how nutritious yogurt is and since I have 2 kids now, I really want them to eat right.

    Eight ounces of yogurt has almost half the calcium kids need daily. No wonder so many families love yogurt—this creamy, tangy food is a cool choice for any time of the day. It can be a yummy treat for breakfast; you can use it in dips or dressings as a healthful alternative for mayonnaise or sour cream; and yogurt is even terrific as a marinade on meat. It's not only delicious, it's very nutritious: Besides being packed with calcium, one serving of yogurt has about a third of the protein recommended for the day. It's also rich in B vitamins.

    Yogurt is made by adding something to pasteurized milk that sounds scary—bacteria. But these harmless micro-organisms (or cultures) help the milk ferment to become yogurt and actually boost your immune system. Sometimes yogurt is heated to give it a longer shelf life, but the process destroys this beneficial bacteria. So when shopping, look for the words "contains live and active cultures" on the label. If you like fruit- flavored yogurt, consider stirring fresh fruit into plain yogurt; varieties sold with fruit may have added sugar.

    The journey of making my very first own yogurt wasn't easy. First I went to many kitchen stores around here and NONE of them sell a yogurt maker. I even went accross the border one time to find it at the Premium Outlet Mall near Seattle and at that time for some reason 3 things I was looking for, including the yogurt maker were sold out! So I decide to just mail order it from my favorite baking store, the King Arthur Flour. It cost a lot to ship it to Canada because their base store is in the States but luckily last weekend I went down again to Seattle to meet my cousin Eliza and when I order the yogurt maker, I asked them to send it to Eliza's address instead so she can give it to me personally.

    So the next morning after my return from Seattle, I went to buy a plain yogurt from the store. I have 2 choices to make home made yogurt, first using a powdered form life culture that I also ordered or I can made yogurt using the life culture from the store bought yogurt that will be mixed with the milk at home. I really want to try the second way.

    So first I boil the milk first then cool it down. This is to ensure that the yogurt is more firm because this is the way I am used to eat yogurt in the States or Canada. I am not sure about in Europe.

    Then when the milk is already cooled down, I mix my store bought yogurt in it. Then pour it into all 7 glass jars. The place the jar in side the yogurt maker for another 6 hrs. If I use skim milk or 2% milk I have to let it stay in there for longer hours and if I want firmer texture, I should add milk powder to it. But for now I want to try the most basic one using whole milk.



    While the yogurt is being made. I made strawberry stew. So easy, basically I just cut them in small pieces, then place all of them in a saucepan, add a little water and as much sugar as I like. In this case... a lot. Then just let it simmer until they are thick. Store them in the fridge together with the yogurt.

    The next morning, I serve my yogurt to my son with a teaspoonfull of the strawberry stew/compote ( I am not sure what to name this mixture ). I also read that I can mix the strawberry with the milk but then the yogurt will not be firm enough and I really want to see how firm the yogurt will be. It's quite firm actually when I taste it for the first time. I am please with the result. Since I am not a yogurt eater, I couldn't say if my home made one taste better than the store bought one. But for now, I can see that my children will eat a nutritious breakfast with this delicious home made yogurt. Next, I am going to make for myself a cool lassi drink with this yogurt. Just use my blender to crush the ice cubes first, then add my yogurt, a little sugar, and a pinch of salt and voila! I have a healthy drink on my hand.

    Oh yeah...the strawberry compote/stew, has the same texture with strawberry jam so it can be use for spread for your toast in the morning.

    Cantonese Roast Duck



    This is my first attempt at making Cantonese Roast Duck. It turn out to be quite easy. Well.. if you read all my recipe, you can tell that I really like easy recipes. Maybe I am just not ambitious enough to try complicated recipes. Or maybe just not yet.

    I think it turn out pretty good .... what do you think?



    This duck can easily feed 4 people or more if you also cook some other dishes to go with it.

    But I have to warn you. Since I want to serve this duck just like the resturant. I have to chop it into smaller pieces. So I grab my big cleaver and just like the roast duck seller I whack my duck like a pro! After I finish whacking my duck into smaller pieces. I saw that my kitchen is full of duck juice splattered all over! Even my blouse ! Oh well....

    Thursday, May 18, 2006

    Obsessing About Food
















    Lately I just realize that I am quiet obsess with food. Just look at my brunch today, while I eat my previously frozen unagi that I always stocked up when ever they are on sale at my Asian grocery, my light reading in the morning is not newspaper, it's a Japanese recipe book that I borrow from the library.

    So, what did I cook for tonight dinner? Here they are:


    The first dish is Sizzling Spicy Shrimp from the Breath of Wok.

    The second dish is my own creation, basically I just want to stir-fry simple vegetable dishes. Since my son loves baby corn, so I just mixed the baby corns with the sugar snap peas. The seasoning couldn't be simpler, just sliced garlic that was fried first with a little bit of oil, then add soy sauce and my very own stock that I made using slow cooker. The sugar snap peas stay sweet and crunchy while the corn absorb the soy sauce and they became a little salty but still crunchy too.



    The third dish is " Mongolian Beef ", from the Breath of Wok again.

    If my morning light reading is Japanese recipe book that I will buy my own copy real soon, then at night, my light reading is another recipe book, this time is a Cantonese Recipe book that I also borrowed from the library. Hmmmm....

    Saturday, May 13, 2006

    CHICKEN CHILLI MOUNTAIN

    One of the great thing about living in Canada is the library. I have no idea why when I lived in the States I insist on buying all my books instead of borrowing from library. Now, I borrow all of my novels from the library that only 3 minutes away from my home by driving. Beside novels, I like to borrow cooking books too. I tried some of the recipes if they are as good as they look then I will buy the book from Amazon or Ebay.

    One day I went to the library I saw this book called Secrets from a Chinese Kitchen by Vivienne and Jenny Lo. What capture my attention first is the photo at the front page. A dish with so many fresh chilies! Wow! I never seen a dish using fresh chilies like that. Most of the time Chinese cooking when they want to use whole chilies, they will use dried chilies. And when they want to use fresh chilies, they usually cut them in pieces. But this dish is using fresh chilies even with their stalks still attached. This is unique!

    So I borrow it and tried it at home the next day. The special thing about this book is at the bottom of each recipe, there is a section where they called "Our Secret" then they will tell you what is the secret of making this dish in the restaurant.

    One thing they forgot to mention is, those fresh chilies do EXPLODE! Not only the smoke are very spicy until my eyes and my nose are watery but those chilies shoot every where like hot missiles! It was so funny, you can hear them popping like crazy and they shoot out from my wok to everywhere. I could not lower the temperature because I couldn't even get close to my wok without getting shot at by the chilies!

    So I use my biggest wok's lid as a shield then I proceed slowly and cautiously to my wok. Fast, I close my wok with the lid then I lower the temperature. Phew!!!

    How is the result? Not bad, but next time I made this dish again, I am going to use dried chilies. One of the reason why I am so excited of trying to make this dish, here in Vancouver, there is tiny Taiwanese restaurant called Kelvin at Victoria Road and 46th Street I think that nobody except Taiwanese know. It is absolutely the best Taiwanese restaurant in here. Most people when they want to eat Taiwanese food, they usually go to the most famous one called Vogue on Cambie Road in Richmond. Vogue has good food also, and for obvious reason all the waitresses are very sexy and very pretty. What they do not know is that the Vogue's chef was a student of Kelvin's chef/owner. He used to work and learn from Kelvin's. Every time I have guests coming to see us, we will take them to eat there and so far, every guest is very satisfied with Kelvin's food. Very well made and they can be very spicy. One of the dish that we like to order is similar to this dish that I tried but Kelvin makes it with ton of dried chilies and it is crisper. A very hot dish! I am not kidding, the amount of the chicken is less than the amount of the dried chilies, not including the Szechuan peppercorn. For a spicy food lover, this dish is a must!

    Since there is no way I can steal the recipe from Kelvin, so this is the best bet I can get to copy that dish. It is not the same, so I will need to tweak and adjust the recipe further to make it closer to Kelvin's.

    CHICKEN CHILLI MOUNTAIN



    Ingredients:
    1 lb chicken legs and/ breast
    salt
    1/2 tsp Sichuan peppercorns, roasted and crushed
    1 beaten egg white
    2 tsp cornstarch
    vegetable oil for deep-frying
    1 lb whole red chili peppers, with stalks
    4 slices ginger finely minced
    1 large spring onion finely chopped
    2 tsp rock or granulated sugar
    1 tbs vinegar ( dark )
    1 Tbs dark soy sauce
    1 Tbs Shaoxing wine
    2 Tbs reduced stock
    2 tsp sesame oil

    Remove the skin from the chicken. Chop each leg into bite size peces. Give all the meat a good bash with the side of a chopper to loosen up the grain. Chop the breast into bite-size pieces. Sprinkle with a pinch of salt and the sichuan peppercorns. Mix in the beaten egg white and the cornflour, stirring until smooth. Marinate for about 30 minutes.

    Heat the wok, then add the oil. When it just begins to smoke, gently lower in the chicken pieces and deep-fry for 2 1/2 minutes until light brown. Move the pieces around to prevent sticking. Scoop out the chicken and set aside. Pour away the oil.

    Heat the wok again with 1 tbs oil. Toss in the chili peppers and turn gently in the oil for 30 seconds. Then add the ginger, onions, and chicken, stirring to prevent sticking. Immediately pour in the sugar, a pinch of salt, vinegar, soy sauce, Shaoxing wine and stock. When the liquid boils, cover and simmer until almost dry, stirring from time to time to prevent sticking. Drizzle with sesame oil.

    Finally stir together and pour into a hot serving dish, arranging the shili in a mountain so that your guests have to root around for the chicken within.

    OUR SECRETS:
    You can control how hot this dish is by selecting the chili peppers carefully. Fat, red ones are milder than the long, thin devils.


    And if you try this dish...well...good luck...

    Thursday, May 11, 2006

    Still Cooking From The Breath of Wok

    I am still playing around with the recipes from the book “The Breath of Wok”. This book is really great. Not only it has such a clean directions, but it also use pretty easy to get ingredients. I guess the author is thinking about American’s taste. She doesn’t use much of ingredients such as pork intestine, pork stomach, liver etc. She use ingredients such as skinless, boneless chicken thigh, just plain pork, beef, crabs, shrimps, you know…stuff that you can get from any American/Canadian grocery stores.

    Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

    Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

    Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

    I don’t remember anymore on how many recipes from this book that I have tried. Yesterday I made the Nevin Lim’s Traditional Oyster Chicken. It taste great. I would love to make it again. I tried the Danny Chan’s Steamed Salmon with Lemon…well… since I am not that a big a fan of fish, I think this is a little too bland for me. For vegetable side dish, since I have plenty of asparagus in my fridge I made the Cecilia Chiang’s Asparagus with Gingko Nuts and Wolfberries dish but without ginkgo nuts and wolfberries. I do have wolfberries but I am just lazy to put them in and I just don’t have the will to go to Asian grocery store just to buy gingko nuts which is available all the time. Without them, the asparagus dish become just a plain stir-fried asparagus but that’s fine with me. I also made Martin Yan’s Mandarin Five-Flavoured Boneless Pork Chops, but believe it or not, I haven’t taste it yet and it’s already eaten by Richard. I think he thought I already had my dinner first with Kai Kai.

    The only chapter that I have not tried from this book is the smoking chapter. I am just worried that the smoke will set off all of my smoking detectors’ alarms! Maybe when I am in Indonesia I will try them.

    Today I also borrowed a book from the library.
    Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
    It’s called Modern Classics Book 2: Cookies, Biscuits & Slices, Small Cakes, Cakes, Desserts, Hot Puddings, Pies & Tarts
    by Donna Hay (Author)

    The recipes looks so easy so I can’t resist to try one of them. I tried the Sponge Cake since it only required 6 eggs, 3/4 cup of sugar, and 1 1/4 cup of flour. How easy is that? Sounds to good to be true right? Well…it is too good to be true. Even though it came out very pretty, but it lack of taste. It is not sweet enough for my taste, I think it needs another 1/2 cup of sugar at least! But I can imagine that my mom might like it since she is diabetic. This recipe doesn’t even need vanilla essence, so I add 2 tsp vanilla essence just to kick it up a notch!

    Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

    Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
    Talking about kicking it up a notch… I receive my Emeril’s pot luck book that I won from Ebay…yeah!!! The reason why I buy this book is because Richard is a big fan of Emeril …

    Still experimenting from the book " The Breath of Wok"

    I am still playing around with the recipes from the book “The Breath of Wok”. This book is really great. Not only it has such a clean directions, but it also use pretty easy to get ingredients. I guess the author is thinking about American’s taste. She doesn’t use much of ingredients such as pork intestine, pork stomach, liver etc. She use ingredients such as skinless, boneless chicken thigh, just plain pork, beef, crabs, shrimps, you know…stuff that you can get from any American/Canadian grocery stores.

    I don’t remember anymore on how many recipes from this book that I have tried. Yesterday I made the Nevin Lim’s Traditional Oyster Chicken. It taste great. I would love to make it again. I tried the Danny Chan’s Steamed Salmon with Lemon…well… since I am not that a big a fan of fish, I think this is a little too bland for me. For vegetable side dish, since I have plenty of asparagus in my fridge I made the Cecilia Chiang’s Asparagus with Gingko Nuts and Wolfberries dish but without ginkgo nuts and wolfberries. I do have wolfberries but I am just lazy to put them in and I just don’t have the will to go to Asian grocery store just to buy gingko nuts which is available all the time. Without them, the asparagus dish become just a plain stir-fried asparagus but that’s fine with me. I also made Martin Yan’s Mandarin Five-Flavoured Boneless Pork Chops, but believe it or not, I haven’t taste it yet and it’s already eaten by Richard. I think he thought I already had my dinner first with Kai Kai.

    The only chapter that I have not tried from this book is the smoking chapter. I am just worried that the smoke will set off all of my smoking detectors’ alarms! Maybe when I am in Indonesia I will try them.

    Today I also borrowed a book from the library.
    Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
    It’s called Modern Classics Book 2: Cookies, Biscuits & Slices, Small Cakes, Cakes, Desserts, Hot Puddings, Pies & Tarts
    by Donna Hay (Author)

    The recipes looks so easy so I can’t resist to try one of them. I tried the Sponge Cake since it only required 6 eggs, 3/4 cup of sugar, and 1 1/4 cup of flour. How easy is that? Sounds to good to be true right? Well…it is too good to be true. Even though it came out very pretty, but it lack of taste. It is not sweet enough for my taste, I think it needs another 1/2 cup of sugar at least! But I can imagine that my mom might like it since she is diabetic. This recipe doesn’t even need vanilla essence, so I add 2 tsp vanilla essence just to kick it up a notch!

    Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
    Talking about kicking it up a notch… I receive my Emeril’s pot luck book that I won from Ebay…yeah!!! The reason why I buy this book is because Richard is a big fan of Emeril …

    Tuesday, May 09, 2006

    Mackerel a la Indonesian

    Never before seen in my blog, an Indonesian dish made by me....haha.

    One day my husband came home from work bringing 2 mackerel fishes. To be honest, I am not a fish eater. First, because I hate scaling and gutting them myself while I think fishmongers never clean enough the fishes I buy from them. There are always scales left and It's just so annoying when I bite my fish and I get scales in my mouth. Second, I think fish are tasteless. Most of the time when I ordered fish dish in the States, they are usually deep fried. While I like fried food but I would rather eat something else. Some Chinese seafood are delicious, but they are still at the mild side. I love sushi and sashimi off course. Third, I hate those bones! I always manage to choke on one or two!

    Indonesian seafood on the other hand are always so tasty! We use tons of seasonings in it. I love Ujung Pandang grill fish, with palm sugar, lime , chilies and green cherry tomatoes for the sauce/dip. It just hard to get green cherry tomatoes unless I grow them myself in the summer time specifically for making this dish. And only when my mom is here to make it for me! She is not a great cook, but this is her specialty dish !

    So when I tried to think of how am I going to cook this mackerels. I only can think Indonesian way. Full of flavour!

    Sure I went first to my cooking library. I found several Japanese recipe on cooking this fish with miso, but I tried it before and I am not that impress with it. I went to search for some recipe from internet but again nothing there. So I am back to my classic childhood dish. It's called "Pepes Ikan". Ikan means fish. Pepes is a way of cooking where you slather the fish with the seasonings made with so many stuff, then you wrap the fish with ...ideally banana leaves ( it has better flavour ), or in my case aluminium foil which cause a little accident to my finger last night ( ouch! ). Then if you use banana leaves you can grill the fish. But in my case I just use my oven at 375F until the fish is done, about 45 minutes.

    I will try to translate the recipe as best as I could. This is hard for me since I rarely cook Indonesian food.



    PEPES IKAN

    Ingredients:

    1 lb fish
    1 lime juice ( kaffir lime is best )
    NOTE: Kaffir lime is smaller than Limes that are sold in the States/Canada, so if you use lime ( I do ), use half is enough.


    1 tsp salt
    30 sweet basil leaves
    (I don't have them so I omit them all together and use 6 curry/salam leaves instead)
    banana leaves or aluminium foil

    Seasonings:

    6 big red chilies ( more for color and flavour than for the heat )
    1 tsp salt
    8 candle nuts, toasted in a wok/oven ( I think you can substitute it with macadamia nuts, they are both creamy )
    3 slices of ginger
    a tiny piece fresh tumeric
    Don't have fresh tumeric? You can use powder of you can omit if all together

    6 shallots
    4 cloves of garlic
    1 tsp tamarind pulp
    1 medium size tomato
    1 lemongrass, use the white part only !

    How to make:

    1. Gutted and clean the fish then rub the lime juice and the salt all over the fish, including the inside.

    2. Throw all of the seasonings into a food processor and processed them until they turn into a smooth paste. Taste it and make sure they taste salty enough and has a little sour taste to it. If it is too sour, add sugar. It may taste very strong to you because of the raw shallots and garlic but trust me, after they are cooked, they will mellow considerably.

    3. Place the fish on an aluminium foil then slatther the fish all over with the seasoning paste( under the fish, inside the fish, and on top of the fish ). Close it tightly then poke several holes with your knifes on the top part of the fish package so that the steam can come out and the fish will not be too soggy. This is because when you use banana leaves and you grill the fish, the paste is going to dry up and cling to the fish. So to achieve this with using aluminium foil, I poke several holes on the top.

    4. Place the fish in the oven at 375F for about 45 minutes.


    When you finally eat this fish, the fish should be moist, the seasoning is not too wet and they will cling to the fish skin and it should taste nutty, salty and a little sour with a little heat to it! Try it, it's delicious!

    You can substitue the fish with shelled raw shrimps too.

    Boy... typing this Indonesian recipe takes more time than if I type 3 western cuisine recipes because I have to look for the English names for the ingredients!

    Friday, May 05, 2006

    Today's menu at my home



    Lately I have been through one of my newest book, The Breath of Wok and some of my old recipe books. I tried 3 new recipes each day. Mostly come from the Breath of Wok. I love that book! All of the recipes that I have tried so far always comes out so tasty! What I love about it the most is the clear instruction. Like how many minute you have to stir fry the garlic first then how many minutes you should not touch the meat yet while they are browning. Awesome book.

    We normally eat Chinese food but off course there are days when I cook something else. Just yesterday I cooked a couple dishes from the breath of Wok also and the dessert yesterday was tutti frutti ice cream! I made that myself with my ice cream maker!

    So, this is an example of our dinner in our home:

    1. Stir-Fried Shrimp Strings


    2. Sweet and sour ribs

    3. Mu-Shu Pork
    4. Slow cook Red Bell Peppers



    You can get the recipes for Sweet and sour ribs, Mu-Shu Pork, and Slow Cook Red Bell Peppers from the Breath of Wok that is widely available in any book store. But for Stir-fried Shrimp Strings, I will give you the recipe here because unless you are very lucky to find it here ( I doubt it very much ), you have to get them in Taipei just like I did.




    Stir-Fried Shrimp Strings

    Ingredients
    450g large size shrimp
    2 Tbs ground pork fat
    2 Tbs ham shreds
    2 black mushrooms ( soaked and shredded )--wood ear mushroom?
    2 Tbs snow peas shreds
    1 Tbs green onion shreds

    Seasonings:
    1/4 tsp salt, 2 egg white, 1 Tbs cornstarch, 1/2 cup water
    1/3 cup soup stock, 1/8 tsp salt, 1/4 tsp sugar, 1/2 tsp sesame oil, a pinch of pepper, 2 tsp cornstarch paste.

    Methods:
    1 Clean the shrimp with 1 tsp salt, rinse with water, drain, and pat dry. Mix with ground pork fat and (1) in a food processor or mixer. Place into a plastic bag, cut a tiny hole on one corner of the bag.
    2 Heat 4 cup oil to 100C, squeeze shrimp mixture out form plastic bag hole into oil, make it into strings, deep-fry over low heat, when it raise up, drain.
    3 Pour out the oil, use only 2 Tbs oil to fry green onion and black mushroom, add ham shreds, snow peas shreds and shrmip strings, add (2), stir evenly and remove to a platter.


    NOTES:

    1. The shrimp should be very fresh and have better quality to get better texture. You may use prawn of lobster.
    2. You may smash the shrimp with the cleaver
    3 Chinese ham have better flavour then western ham, since it's very salty, taste before adding salt.